Teenage Boys Mental Health

New research shows that half (49%) of teenage boys would not feel comfortable talking to their dads about their mental health (including stress, anxiety and depression). When asked why, more than a third said it was because their dad doesn’t talk about his feelings and 31% said they wouldn’t want to burden them.

The survey revealed that 37% of young men chose to ‘put a brave face on’ when struggling with mental health problems and 33% would rather keep it to themselves.

The poll[1] of 16-18 year old men is released today by Time to Change, the campaign run by Mind and Rethink Mental Illness to change public attitudes towards mental health. The research, which found that a quarter of teenage boys experience mental health problems at least once a week, aims to uncover the extent to which teenage boys’ attitudes and behaviour towards mental health is influenced by their fathers.

While a high number of teenage boys consider talking about mental health with their dads to be off limits, Time to Change is highlighting the positive impact of role-modelling behaviour from fathers to sons. 70% of sons felt completely comfortable talking about their mental health when this had been encouraged by their father. The research also showed that virtually all teenage boys who were comfortable opening up to their father about mental health (98%) said that they would want to have a similarly open relationship with their sons in the future.

Time to Change is now urging all dads to talk more openly, so that if and when their sons develop mental health problems in the future, they can be on hand with support. The newly released research also offers a helpful insight into how teenage boys would like their dads to reach out. The majority of young people wanted their fathers to talk to them (57%) with others stating a preference for a less direct approach such as going out somewhere together (26%).

Over the next five years, Time to Change will introduce a targeted campaign to encourage men to think and act differently about mental health problems and be more open and supportive of friends, family and colleagues.

Source – https://www.time-to-change.org.uk/news/half-teenage-boys-dont-feel-they-can-open-their-dads-about-mental-health

6 Antidepressant Side Effects I Didn’t See Coming

 

Doctor Writing Out Rx Prescription

To say it’s a game-changer would be the understatement of the year.

In recent years, depression had become more widely understood. This has been, in many ways, fantastic for those of us who suffer from what is sometimes referred to as “the black dog.” At other times, it can be frustrating, because there’s more to depression that people outside it first suppose.

Everyone is familiar with the numbness, the crying and the suicidal thoughts — the head stuff, if you like. Those of us stuck with it also know there’s more to it than that, but it’s difficult to know exactly what.

No Orgasms For Me: Antidepressants Totally Killed My Libido

I’ve had depression all my life and I had no idea some of these things were so strongly related to my condition, until, well… my meds started working. It makes it a lot easier to like yourself when you find out that you aren’t as lazy, scatty, or clingy as you may appear.

So, for all those people with a vested interest in depression and those of us who suffer from it, here are the things I couldn’t do until my meds started working.

1. I Was Able to Finish Reading a Book in Less Than Six Weeks

Depression messes with your concentration. It never occurred to me that the reason I couldn’t read more than a page or so at a time of any given novel had more to do with my depression than my dyslexia. I thought I was just too slow at reading, then my meds worked.

2. I Was Finally Able to Sleep With the Lights Off

I couldn’t shake the feeling of the world closing in. If I couldn’t see anything at all, I would start to hyperventilate. I hated the isolation. At my lowest point, I suffered auditory hallucinations. On top of that, my chemicals were so out of whack that I didn’t need darkness to sleep anyway, I just needed opportunity — not even comfortable opportunity.

I’ve slept in lecture theaters, face down on computer keyboards, and even once in a supermarket. Now, it’s a different story. I have to have low light and take my time to drop off. Being able to read more than a page or so really helps. I thought I was a champion sleeper, then my meds worked.

3. I Kept My Bedroom Tidy

It’s incredible how easy it is to make a mess when you’re severely depressed. My room was so often under a foot of laundry that my partner used to joke I didn’t need carpets. I knew it was ridiculous, but I just couldn’t seem to stretch the extra inches to drop my dirty laundry into the washing basket.

My partner would round it up and wash it. I know what you’re thinking: how spoiled, I wouldn’t do that for my kids, but honestly, I’m too old to cover up smells with body spray, and that’s what I had started doing.

Then, my incredibly patient partner would put my clean clothes in a pile on my bed. All I had to do was pick up the piles, turn ninety degrees and put them in the drawers. That was too much. My clean clothes would end up on the floor, mixing with the dirty ones, and the mugs, plates, empty drinks cans, and other crap that would pile up because it was too much to take anything downstairs.

It was horrid. I thought I was just a slob, then my meds worked.

4. I Could Leave My Phone at Home Without Panicking

I’ll be the first to admit I’m hooked on the internet. Most people have a somewhat unhealthy connection with their phone these days, either because of Facebook, Twitter, eBay or whatever. This wasn’t that. This was an honest to goodness terror of being disconnected.

I was totally afraid of being alone, not being able to contact friends, even if only briefly. Quick texts became a mainstay of my coping mechanisms. Just the ability to reach out and make human contact with someone, if only to receive a smiley in return.

It helped a lot, on the odd occasion it actually got me through a dark thought or two. Knowing that is probably why I was so scared of being without it. I couldn’t go about more than 15 minutes without checking my phone, then my meds worked.

How To Still Be A GREAT Parent When You’re Depressed

5. I Drank Enough Water

I actually quite like really cold water. We have it freely accessible at work. All I had to do was fill my bottle, then fill my face. This was too much for me. Sometimes, I’d get to supper time having drunk nothing. I’d just about manage some soda at dinner time, or maybe some fruit juice.

It didn’t matter how much my partner nagged. She would hand me glasses of water, I’d take two sips, put them down, and they’d sit untouched. They still do some nights, but that’s because I’m no fan of our village water supply. My constant dehydration probably added to the problems I was having with my mental health. I just couldn’t see it. I thought the whole benefit of hydration was a myth, then my meds worked.

6. I Actually Enjoyed Silence

There’s a lot of white noise in your head, and when you’re depressed it hates you. It goes on and on about things that it knows will upset you. If it’s not one thing, it’s another. I found that if I blocked the noises with music, films, anything at all, then I wasn’t likely to have a meltdown over some bullsh*t thing my head was banging on about now.

It takes its toll, constantly having noise is exhausting of the senses. Silence is restful, it’s good for the soul. I wanted to love it but I couldn’t stand it, then my meds worked.

I still have bad days, and sometimes these things come back and bite me on the proverbial, but now I know what causes them I can deal with them.

I didn’t write this article to crow about my meds… well, not just that anyway. Hopefully, it’ll shine a bit of a light for other people stuck with the same subtle, yet pervading physical symptoms of the dreaded depression.

This guest article originally appeared on YourTango.com: 6 VERY Unexpected Side Effects Of Finally Going On Antidepressants.

 

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5 Times to Embrace the Power of Negative Thinking

9 Ways to Let Go of Stuck ThoughtsYes, REALLY.

My whole life I have been told to embrace the power of positive thinking. This was something a lot of adults said to me, a negative, nervous little girl, riddled with anxiety.

Well, that and “stop worrying or you’ll give yourself an ulcer.”

Thanks, Mrs. Nicholson! Ulcers don’t work that way! Anxiety is more than something other than an annoyance for you to deal with from 9 to 3! Fourth grade was a living nightmare and also I hate you!

19 Quotes For When Anxiety Feels Completely Overwhelming

The truth of the matter is this, our negative emotions are just as important in our lives as our positive emotions.

I know that I, for one, used to view my negative emotions as things that were “bad”, that I needed to change. But in his new book, The Power Of Negative Thinking, Dr. Tim Lomas shows what he’s learned over the course of his career thus far — and a big part of that is how our understanding our negative emotions and letting them be can actually make us much more happier in the long run.

Here are some examples of the physical and mental benefits of our negative emotions. Now if you will excuse me, while you read I will go have a good cry.

1. Pulling Away When You’re Sad

When you go through something like a big break up, or you’re mourning the loss of a loved one, it’s totally normal to retreat from the world, wrap yourself up in a blanket and lay in your bed with only Netflix and the delivery guy for company and comfort. It’s just as normal for your friends to try and break you out of your funk.

But here’s the thing, neuroscientists have found that when you retreat this way your brain is telling your body to go into its own very necessary form of hibernation. It’s doing what it needs to do to let you heal and to help you feel stronger than ever. Let the streets know!

2. Crying Your Eyes Out

I cry at the drop of the hat. Happy, sad, angry, I am prone to cry. I used to get frustrated about this because as a working woman it’s a tough enough struggle as it is already without adding an ocean of tears into the equation. Plus, crying when you’re say, having a fight with a partner, completely undermines you leaving both parties frustrated.

Luckily there’s science behind our weeping. Tears remove toxins (including stress hormones), kill bacteria, and keep our mucus membranes moist and lubricated, making our sight better than ever. You know that great feeling of calm after a bout of weeping? There’s biology behind it! Crying clears up your perspective in more ways than one.

3. Feeling Incredibly Bored

When I was kid I was constantly complaining to my parents about being bored. My dad would cryptically respond to my complaints with “talk to me in twenty years.” I know what he means now, and I miss those days where I had even an extra to waste on a feeling like boredom.

It turns out I’m pining with good reason. A scientist discovered a strange pattern in our brain activity when we aren’t engaged in a specific task. He called this pattern the Default Mode Network (DMN). Today neuroscientists believe that the DMN plays a critical role in our artistic ideas, new thoughts, and sense of self. In short, when you think you’re bored you are probably right on track to be struck with a brilliant idea.

TERRIFYING: This Is What Happens To Your Body When You’re Stressed

4. When You’re Lonely

There is a real difference between feeling lonely and enjoy solitude. In the fuss of our constantly connected age, now more than ever we need to remember not just how to disconnect, but how to be alone, enjoying or solitude without feeling “lonely.”

Enjoying solitude can allow for your brain to “reboot,” helps bolster productivity, and solve problems with greater ease. There’s more to enjoying a night to yourself than eating a pint of ice cream and watching Mean Girls, science says so.

5. Those Times Anxiety Strikes

Anxiety is something we all experience in one form or another. Unless you are suffering from an anxiety disorder, daily anxiety can be helpful in encouraging you to test your boundaries, push yourself, and to be better prepared to face adversity.

Astronaut Chris Hadfield calls this embracing the power of negative thinking, and he’s right. Rather than looking at any of these negative feelings as hindrances, we should start seeing all the ways in which these natural and normal emotions help us in very real ways every day.

This guest article originally appeared on YourTango.com: 5 Scientific Reasons Anxious, Negative People Are Actually HEALTHIER.Save

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