New Theory Proposed on How the Brain Learns Basic Math

Source: ScienceDailyA new theory regarding how the brain first learns basic math could alter approaches to identifying and teaching students with math learning disabilities. Now researchers offer a better understanding of how, when and why people grasp every day math skills.
New Theory Proposed on How the Brain Learns Basic Math
New Theory Proposed on How the Brain Learns Basic Math
American Psychological
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Top 5 Most Common Myths about Taking Antidepressants

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Don’t be ashamed to get the help you need — however you need it.

As a person who has depression, is on medications and is in therapy (I swear, I’m sane!), I’ve had plenty people comment on my use of antidepressants, or spout out myths around me about medications for depression that simply aren’t true.

To put it simply: I’m tired of hearing it and feeling awkward having to correct them or inform them on their mistakes. (But hey, you live and you learn, I guess?)

10 Agonizing Truths Depressed People Never Talk About

Anyway, from both experience and research, I just wanted to debunk a few of the most common myths that have come up around me about antidepressants and depression:

1. Antidepressants Make You Happy.

Nope. As amazing as it would be to have a happiness pill, that is not a thing. Otherwise it would be in MUCH higher demand, right?

But no, that is not a reality. When a person has clinical depression, they have an overall low feeling that causes constant distress. All an antidepressant does is lessen those constant negative thoughts and feelings so a person can actually make it through a day feeling relatively normal (whatever that means).

2. They’re the Easy Way Out.

First off, there isn’t really an “out” of clinical depression. If you have it, you have it, though over time it is possible to be weaned off of certain medications (discuss this with your doctor if interested). But as stated above, antidepressants aren’t happy-pills. A person with depression will still deal with their depression, but on a much smaller scale, if prescribed properly.

3. All You REALLY Need Is Therapy.

The first thing you should know is that not even therapists think this, so if you really think you’re more aware than professionals and people actually going through it, sorry, but you’re wrong.

While I personally think everyone can benefit from therapy, any therapist/psychologist/etc. will tell you that there are some people that can only benefit so much from therapy, and thus need the assistance of antidepressants. A depressed patient has this sort of impenetrable wall around them that will make it difficult or impossible for any therapy to truly help.

What It’s Like Inside The Psychological Purgatory of Depression

4. Antidepressants Give You Horrible Side Effects That Make You MORE Depressed.

This is only the case for people who:

a) Don’t have clinical depression, but were very sad and were wrongly prescribed medication.

b) Need a different medication

Lots of people are prescribed antidepressants who shouldn’t be. Before taking antidepressants, a person should be aware if there is a cause for the mood change (such as the death of a loved one) or whether its an overall constant feeling. If an antidepressant doesn’t have any depression to treat, other reactions to it can occur.

This should not deter you from looking into the potential side-effects of your medication, and if bothersome or dangerous side-effects occur, you should speak with your primary doctor to find another solution immediately.

5. They Numb You.

Antidepressant treatments are pretty unique, and there’s definitely no one-size-fits-all medication. Sometimes the first medication taken isn’t the right one, either because of side effects, the medications simply not working, or actually triggering other feelings that are abnormal to a person.

If any of these things are a concern, a doctor is an appointment away, and they will happily help you find something better.

I was lucky enough, when first prescribed, to have my first suggestion work great! My depression numbed me to every feeling but sadness and anger, so once my antidepressant worked into my system, my range of feelings actually expanded to a “normal” variety.

I still remember sitting in my room at the end of a day and thinking: woah…people can feel like THIS? I’m allowed to feel this okay?? It was a freeing feeling and I have no regrets.

It’s certainly not for everyone, and I don’t think that antidepressants are even the perfect solution. But if prescribed correctly, it can help so much. Basically, don’t knock it ‘til you try it (safely), and even then, don’t knock it until you’ve tried another. Make sense?

This guest article originally appeared on YourTango.com: 5 Ridiculous LIES About Antidepressants (By Someone Who’s On Them).


Top 5 Most Common Myths about Taking Antidepressants
Top 5 Most Common Myths about Taking Antidepressants
Disorders
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True Story: One Father’s Struggle with Postpartum Depression

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Dads get the “baby blues” too.

People might not realize this, but, after the birth of a child, both women and men can encounter symptoms of postpartum depression. I’m speaking from experience here.

After the birth of my daughter, which endures as one of the happiest moments of my life, I found myself struggling with unexpected waves of anxiety, fear, and depression.

It was horrible, and what made it worse, was that I was very uncomfortable talking about it.

8 Heartbreaking Secrets ALL Men Keep From The Women They Love

Here’s why — don’t you hate it when a couple says “we’re pregnant”?

I do. Because the dude isn’t pregnant. He’s not going to have to squeeze a bowling ball out of his downstairs business, so, c’mon, give credit where credit is due — SHE is pregnant and the guy is along for the ride.

I’ve never liked it when a man tried to make the pregnancy about him. He plays a part, sure, but, I was always of the opinion that, as a guy, there is NO way that I can ever comprehend the physical and emotional toll of pregnancy, so my role was to sit back, be supportive, and shut up.

And, for the most part, I think that strategy works.

However, I wasn’t prepared for how “shutting up” would negatively impact me AFTER my wife gave birth.

Because becoming a parent stirs up deep, powerful emotions. And, while many of those feelings are overwhelmingly sunny and positive, they can, sometimes, cast a shadow. Those epic highs lend themselves to equally epic lows and, suddenly, you find yourself crying and you don’t know why.

Once we brought my daughter home, I found myself confronted with those overpowering moments of terror and panic and I didn’t say anything about them.

Why? Because my wife had just gone through a freakin’ c-section. She’d spent almost a year getting sick every day, while a living creature grew in her belly, and then doctors had to cut her open to pull the creature out. They then sewed her up, handed her the creature, and expected that she’d know how to feed and care for it.

That’s a lot of shit to put on a person. No question — my wife had it WORSE than I did. There’s no comparison.

However, just because things were harder for my wife doesn’t mean that they weren’t also hard for me. She might win the miserable contest, hands down, but I was still in a really bad place. And I was too embarrassed to let my support network know that I needed them.

The more I’ve talked to new fathers, the more common I realize this experience is.

We’ve all just watched our partners go through one of the most intense physical experiences in the world, so we just feel ashamed to admit that we’re hurting a little too. It feels like our struggles are frivolous in comparison, but the fact is they’re very, very real and painful. Postpartum depression can be painfully real for men too, even if it’s embarrassing.

It all came to a head for me the first evening I spent alone with my daughter.

I’d encouraged my wife to go out with some friends — she’d only consented to leave for a few hours — and told her I’d be fine. Our baby was so good and happy. A little alone time was going to be good for us.

So she left. And my daughter started crying. She rarely cried.

And she cried, as if she’d been set on fire, for three hours non-stop.

I was beside myself. She never did this and, no matter what I tried, I could not get her to stop.

It shredded me, but I knew I couldn’t call my wife. I wanted her to have a fun first night out. I didn’t want her to worry. I was supposed to able to handle this.

My wife called me when she was leaving to come home, and I guess she heard the panic in my voice. She asked if I was OK. My voice cracked and I said, “Just please get here soon.”

She raced home and, the SECOND she stepped into our apartment, my daughter stopped crying. The baby smiled. The baby laughed. The baby goddamn cooed.

I handed her to my confused wife without a word, went into our bedroom, locked the door, laid down on the bed, and cried for thirty minutes.

Once I opened the door again, my wife and I had our first conversation about my postpartum depression.

I will say, my depression was extremely manageable in comparison to some stories I’ve heard. It came in waves that seemed to grow smaller and smaller as I became more comfortable as a father. So I was lucky.

Lucky it wasn’t more severe and lucky that my partner was so supportive (even though, again, she had it SO much worse than I did).

My Kids Like Their Dad More Than They Like Me

But, more than anything, it really opened my eyes about the importance of men needing to talk about postpartum depression.

It doesn’t just happen to women. It is important. And it is valid and OK acknowledge that you’re not feeling right, even when you know your partner is feeling worse.

Men — don’t be afraid to speak up about your anxiety and emotions following the birth of a child.

The healthiest thing you can do, for everyone, is get your feelings out into the open and let your support network do their job, even if they’re breastfeeding and changing diapers while they do it.

This guest article originally appeared on YourTango.com: Yes, Men Suffer From Postpartum Depression Too (Trust Me, I Know).


True Story: One Father’s Struggle with Postpartum Depression
True Story: One Father’s Struggle with Postpartum Depression
Disorders
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New Anti-Inflammatory Drugs May Help Treat Depression

Source: Yahoo News – ScienceA new group of anti-inflammatory drugs may help treat depression, a new review finds. And the link between these drugs and depression may shed light on the role that inflammation plays in the mental health condition, according to the review of previously published research. The new anti-inflammatory drugs, which are currently used to treat autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis, were found to also reduce symptoms of…
New Anti-Inflammatory Drugs May Help Treat Depression
New Anti-Inflammatory Drugs May Help Treat Depression
American Psychological
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